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What next for Australia's darting wonderkid Corey Cadby?

Jamie Shaw 29 Aug 2016
Cadby celebrates in Perth (credit:Matchroom Sport )

Perhaps the biggest success story of this year's World Series has been the unearthing of Australian starlet Corey Cadby, but the youngster's swift rise to prominence now means he has some big decisions to make.
 
Those in the know Down Under had long been raving about the potential of the self-proclaimed 'King' - who is hoping to conquer the Australian darts circuit before turning his attention to the UK in the coming months. 

The 21-year-old gave a fine account of himself on his television debut in Sydney, going down 6-3 to Phil Taylor, before sensationally returning the favour in Perth a week later, defying a 111.65 average from 'The Power' with a 103.58 of his own in a 6-2 victory dubbed the biggest upset in World Series history.

Though his 10-2 defeat at the hands of Peter Wright may appear emphatically one-sided on paper, Cadby's 109.57 end average suggests otherwise, with only his restricted attempts at doubles proving the difference.

Cadby will now be hoping that whirlwind week in August can be the catalyst to launching his career as a PDC professional, though he has a long way to go first, quite literally.

Originally from Tasmania, Cadby relocated 300 miles to the mainland of Melbourne to cut down on the travelling required to compete on the DPA (Dart Players Australia) circuit full-time and has certainly reaped the rewards of that decision.

The fearless youngster has seven DPA titles to his name in 2016, including a memorable hat-trick in one weekend in Victoria in March, guiding him to second in the DPA Order of Merit and just one point behind leader David Platt with three events remaining.

The leader of the Order of Merit following the final event of the season on November 5 will qualify by right for December's World Championship, while the chasing pack face a last chance saloon at the Oceanic Masters a day later - with the winner also heading to Ally Pally.

Cadby is gearing up for a potentially life-changing climax to 2016, one which will test his ability, character and desire. So, where does darts' new kid on the block go from here? 

World Youth Championship


Cadby will touch down in the UK for the first time ahead of the PDC World Youth Championship in Wigan on October 16 and looks set to make his debut on the Development Tour (open to any player aged 16-23) the day before.

The Aussie will battle it out in a fiercely competitive 64-man field alongside the likes of reigning champion Max Hopp, Rowby-John Rodriguez, Josh Payne and Keegan Brown for the right to reach the final in Minehead the following month.

Reaching the final would be a shortcut onto the PDC circuit full-time, with £10,000 going to the winner, £5,000 to the runner-up, as well as a two-year Tour Card and a place in the following year's Grand Slam of Darts for both.



World Series Finals


The 24-man field for the November's World Series Finals in Glasgow will be comprised of the top eight seeded players from the World Series Order of Merit, alongside a further 16 qualifiers.

Last year's line-up featured eight 'international prospects' invited to compete on the basis of their performances on the ProTour and international events during the year.

Cadby's exploits on home soil this summer would make him a shoo-in to the field, with PDC director Rod Harrington admitting during commentary that he will get his vote, though the timing of the invitational event presents him with a logistical nightmare.

The World Series Finals run from November 5-6, the same weekend as the final DPA Grand Prix events in New South Wales, making it highly unlikely Cadby will take up his invite with securing a place in the World Championship in mind.



Winmau World Masters


Cadby's triumph in July's Australian Grand Masters, a WDF-recognised event, means he will receive an invitation to compete in the 2016 BDO Winmau World Masters.

The 2016 World Masters, which is the BDO's second most prestigious major, runs from November 24-27, and as Cadby is neither a PDC Tour Card holder or PDPA Associate Member at present, he is eligible to pick and choose where and when he plays his darts.

However, the World Masters takes place on the same weekend as the PDC Players Championship Finals in Minehead, during which the final of the World Youth Championship will be contested. Should Cadby reach the World Youth final, he would be likely to reject his World Masters invitation at short notice.

World Championship


As mentioned, Cadby is hot on the heels of Platt at the summit of the DPA rankings, meaning he needs to better his rival's results over the course of the final three events if he is to seal a World Championship debut.

Reaching the First Round at Alexandra Palace would guarantee him at least £10,000 in prize money, as well as invaluable TV exposure on the sport's biggest stage in front of a worldwide audience. 

Cadby would most certainly be a name to avoid in the draw for any PDC professional should he get there and would hope to follow in the footsteps of fellow countrymen Kyle Anderson, Beau Anderson and Loz Ryder, who all impressed on their debuts in recent years.



Q School


Cadby's involvement in 2017 Qualifying School could hinge on a number of factors, predominantly whether or not he qualifies for the World Championship. 

Prior to the Sydney Masters, Cadby was signed up by the Sportsman Management Company, whose stable also includes Kyle Anderson, and the intention appears to be to keep Cadby in the UK after the World Championship up until Q School commences in early January.

Reaching the World Youth Final would eradicate the need for him to battle it out for one of roughly 30 available Tour Cards in a gruelling 400+ field, while failure to qualify for the World Championship would mean Cadby would have to travel back to Australia with a big decision to make regarding his future.

With the majority of tour events held in the UK, Cadby would need to relocate from Australia in order to have a serious crack at the tour and has already sought advice from Anderson, who faced the same quandary two years ago.



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What next for Australia's darting wonderkid Corey Cadby?

Perhaps the biggest success story of this year's World Series has been the unearthing of Australian starlet Corey Cadby, but the youngster's swift rise to prominence now means he has some big decisions to make.

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